The Many Jobs Of Medical Billing

As much fun as everything else is in college, the homework and the classes could be considered boring, or a waste of time. If you feel this way, look up the definition of “college.” It’s about the education you get just as much as it is about personal growth and fun. Plus, what you do in your classes will have a profound effect on your post-undergraduate options. And, believe it or not, if you picked the right major, it can sometimes be satisfying to go to class. Regardless, that’s what you came to school for, and you need not forget that. Work hard.

Talk with your advisors and check out your college’s course catalog. There is a lot of information you can find regarding required courses and other major related specifics. Use the resources available to you so that you can remain well-informed throughout the decision making process.

Believe it or not, employers do not hire people within a week of posting their ad. Often times they spend weeks eliminating people in grueling step by step interview processes. You may have one interview with a supervisor and then get passed on to another person a week later. Don’t think you can start looking for a job two weeks before graduation and be just fine. Start looking a couple months in advance. Get a working resume going, and even go to your college career center for help.

Bread, Pies, Donuts. Bread is one staple all families have to have on hand. Mom and Dad shopped the bread bakeries directly by buying day old bread, pies and donuts. You cannot tell the difference and many times it is fresher than what you buy at the grocery stores. Most of the time, prices are 80% less than what you would pay in the grocery store.

Creative Writing Camp: Writing Young Adult Fiction, children ages 11 to 15 explore young adult fiction and learn how to write for their age group, 9 a.m.-noon July 19-23, Bethel College, 1001 Bethel Circle, Mishawaka; (574) 807-7000.

Career field resumes — that are geared to telling a story about the future Hill staffer you, or the future Peace Corps volunteer you. These resumes might only resemble each other by your name in bold at the top. Your Hill resume tells me everything you’ve ever done politically and with research and writing, and dealing with the public. And possibly, if you need to fill some space, your domestic policy coursework. And not much more. Your Peace Corps resume tells me everything you’ve ever done as a volunteer, all of your international travel, your language capabilities, and possibly, all of your international coursework. And not much more.

Do informational interviewing as a reality check for the above. Find out from your contacts in the career field you’re interested in if your skill set is up-to-date.